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Friday Forum Spring Semester 2007 - 08

January 25, 2008 - Megan Thomas (Dept. of Politics, UC-Santa Cruz)

History without Documents: Sources and Methods in the Historical Writings of Philippine Nationalists

In the 1880s, a number of young Filipinos became interested in writing the history of their people(s) before the arrival of the Spaniards. Hampered by a lack of surviving documents, they employed novel methods—including those of ethnology, linguistics, and folklore—and read Spanish sources against the grain, writing innovative histories during this period of nationalist thought and political agitation.

February 1, 2008 - Shoua Yang (Visiting Asst. Prof., UW-Stevens Point, Political Science)

Hmong Social and Political Capital: The Formation and Maintenance of Hmong-American Organizations

Previous studies on Hmong-American organizations focus on the issues of intraorganizational conflicts, managerial styles, and functional responsibilities. Although these studies have provided meaningful analyses on serveral aspects of these organizations, what has been left undetected is the topic of organizational formation and maintenance. The talk examines a sample of Hmong-American organizations to explain the formation and maintenance of these cultural émigré organizations. How are these organizations formed in the first place? How have these organizations survived over time?

February 8, 2008 - Kevin Hewison (Director, Carolina Asia Center; Dept. of Asian Studies, UNC at Chapel Hill)

Post-Thaksin Thailand;  Made possible by the University Lectures Committee

Thaksin Shinawatra came to power as a representative of the business class, transformed into a "populist" representative of the poor and dispossessed and was overthrown in a palace-military coup. The paper traces these developments and reflects on the emergence of a conservative Thai-style democracy as an opposition to "populist" mass politics.

February 15, 2008 - Kikue Hamayotsu (Dept. of Political Science, NIU.)

The Welfare State or Faith? Explaining Weak Islamist Mobilization in Malaysia

How do Islamists recruit committed activists and what are the conditions for successful recruitment for Islamist movements? This talk attempts to explain outcomes in the interesting case of Malaysia, where Islamist movements have largely been unsuccessful in recruiting committed followers in one of the most important electoral constituencies: the urban middle-class. Drawing on extensive fieldwork, Prof. Hamayotsu shows that the Malaysian State’s provision of both secular and religious services significantly affects organizational and ideological conditions for Islamist recruitment, and sets Malaysia apart from many other Islamic societies by moderating forces for Islamic radicalism.

February 22, 2008 - Nora Taylor (Alsdorf Professor of South and Southeast Asian Art, School of the Art Institute of Chicago)

Anti-Art in Vietnam: Adventures in (in)visual anthropology

In spite of rapid economic growth and increased international attention, in the past few years artists in Vietnam have also been subject to greater creative restriction and renewed government censorship. This talk will examine the imaginative ways in which some Vietnamese artists have created experimental works that remain invisible to officials and manage nonetheless to find their way into international bienniales and triennials under the category of non-object, event based, collaborative art.

February 29, 2008 - Gadis Arivia (Philosophy/Women's Studies, University Indonesia)

Women and Freedom in the Reformasi Era in Indonesia

Women in Indonesia are facing problems of political and civil liberties in the Reformasi Era. Although Indonesian women have enjoyed some political freedom, they are restricted in their civil liberties due to a new kind of fundamentalism.

March 7, 2008 - Christina Schwenkel, Co-Sponsered by Trauma Tourism
Tales of Salvation: Humanitarian Tourism and Historical (Ir)Reconciliation in Vietnam

This paper looks at the return of US veterans to Vietnam and their efforts to "heal the wounds of war" and mitigate suffering through humanitarian interventions that reinvoke capitalist rescue narratives. Tensions that arise in joint Vietnamese-US commemorative practices that accompany such interventions show reconciliation to be a highly ambivalent, multifaceted process with complex notions of "healing" for all involved.

March 28, 2008 - Nancy Smith-Hefner (Boston University)
Print Culture and the New Muslim Sexology
Recent studies of Islam in Indonesia, as with studies of Islam in most parts of the world, emphasize pluralized or fractionalized models of religious authority and leadership. One of the most striking features of the contemporary Muslim scene in countries like Indonesia has been the catapulting of various new Muslim intellectuals into a broad array of heretofore secular scholarly topics. In contemporary Indonesia nowhere is this more striking than in the new scholarship and publication on sex, and with it the emergence of a new Muslim sexology.

April 11, 2008 - Duncan McCargo (Professor of Southeast Asian Politics, School of Politics and International Studies, University of Leeds)

Reflecting on the Southern Thai conflict:  Islam and Legitimacy in Pattani

Thailand's Malay Muslim majority Southern border provinces have been experiencing a renewed violent conflict since January 2004.  This presentation will explore the political underpinnings of the violence, arguing that this is essentially a struggle over land, legitimacy and power, rather that an example of  a global or regional jihad.

April 18, 2008 - Sheila Coronel (Journalism, Columbia University)
Print Culture and the New Muslim Sexology
Twenty-two years after they ousted the dictator Ferdinand Marcos in a peaceful uprising, Filipinos are pessimistic about the future of their damaged democracy. What are the prospects for democratic reform in the Philippines? Who are the change agents?

April 25, 2008 - Christina Schwenkel, Co-Sponsered by Trauma Tourism
Tales of Salvation: Humanitarian Tourism and Historical (Ir)Reconciliation in Vietnam

This paper looks at the return of US veterans to Vietnam and their efforts to "heal the wounds of war" and mitigate suffering through humanitarian interventions that reinvoke capitalist rescue narratives. Tensions that arise in joint Vietnamese-US commemorative practices that accompany such interventions show reconciliation to be a highly ambivalent, multifaceted process with complex notions of "healing" for all involved.

Room Change - 206 Ingraham Hall

May 2, 2008 - Carl Thayer (Political Science, University New South Wales, and currently Frances M. & Stephen F. Fuller Distinguished Visiting Prof. of Southeast Asian Studies, Ohio University)
Vietnam's One-Party System and the Challenge of Civil Society
Vietnam's economic transformation and opening to the outside world has produced a variety of domestic responses ranging across the spectrum from civil society groups willing to work within the system to non-violent opposition groups that have confronted the communist regime. This lecture looks at recent developments and highlights two new factors: growing cross-fertilization among Vietnam's civil society groups and increased involvement by overseas Vietnamese pro-democracy groups.

May 9, 2008 - Francis Gealogo (History, Ateneo de Manila University)

The 1918 Influenza Pandemic in the Philippines: A Social and Demographic History

The talk discusses the impact of the 1918 influenza pandemic in Philippine society and its population. It provides some demographic data both on the national and local level, with emphasis on the mortality and morbidity rates that were caused by the pandemic. At the same time, the paper analyzes the implementation of public health programs, the politics of colonial health policies and the reception of the people to the public health measures implemented by the American colonial government during the pandemic.

 

 

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Center for Southeast Asian Studies
University of Wisconsin-Madison
207 Ingraham Hall
1155 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1397
phone: (608) 263-1755
fax: (608) 263-3735
e-mail: seasia@intl-institute.wisc.edu