Friday Forum & Anthro Job Talk: Darcie DeAngelo (VIRTUAL)

Virtual

My fieldwork confronted me with two technologies- bombs and rats. Both were integral to understanding relations in the aftermath of war—that, in fact, these relations were transformed not only by the humans but by the nonhumans who actively disarmed the land, namely, landmine detection rats. Fears of militarism became disrupted when a rat came into the minefield. The rat itself provoked feelings of love between human deminers. The rat, as landmine detection technology and a being, helped to alter feelings of war that the bombs perpetuated. I soon began to realize that this had implications for how trauma and healing, ecological relations, and transitional justice, all of which I found to be entangled.

History Job Talk: Siew Han Yeo

Curti Lounge, 5243 Mosse Humanities Building 455 N. Park St., Madison, WI

Masculinity, Sexuality, and the Construction of  ‘Chinese’ Identities in Colonial Burma Siew Han Yeo  PhD Candidate in History University of Toronto Location: Curti Lounge, Room 5243 Humanities Building. Part of the Social Justice in Southeast …

Anthro Job Talk: Seinenu Thein-Lemelson (VIRTUAL)

Virtual

The Burmese democracy movement and the community of political prisoners (known colloquially as naingkyin) that comprised it had a profound impact upon the trajectory of modern Burma, yet their contributions have been overlooked by scholars. What little scholarship exists on the democracy movement ignores the naingkyin’s culture, psychology, and subjectivity. There are no accounts of Burma written from the naingkyin’s point of view and few accounts that represent them as complex, whole, reflexive human beings embedded in an equally complex, whole, reflexive community. In this talk, I move past the dominant transnational discourses that have been used to analyze the Burmese democracy movement—that of human rights, humanitarianism, neoliberalism and the public health model of trauma. Instead, I focus on an indigenous concept known as anitnah, which resembles the English term of “sacrifice..."

Friday Forum & Anthro Job Talk: Veronika Kusumaryati (VIRTUAL)

Virtual

After the brutal killing of George Floyd sparked antiracism protests worldwide, Black youth organized protests in West Papua, Indonesia’s marginalized and easternmost region. In 2019, Papuans protested against entrenched racism in Indonesian society, when Papuan students in Java were subjected to racist epithets. Since then, Papuans have used the hashtag #Papuanlivesmatter to articulate their connection with broader antiracism protests across the world and bring the Papuan experience to #BlackLivesMatter movements. While global Black political movements have long shaped Papuan identities, the new Papuan Lives Matter movement shows how digital media have played an influential role in the spread of antiracism protests and how Blackness has been understood and articulated not only in relation to white supremacy but also to postcolonial claims of multiculturalism in Asian societies. This presentation discusses the specific context in which protests under Papuan Lives Matter emerged and its relationship with the global Black Lives Matter movements. This presentation also explores the idea of Blackness in West Papua that stems not only from the influence of and conversation with American Black political movements and African liberation movements but also lived experience as a Black people under Indonesian occupation.

History Job Talk: Faizah Zakaria (VIRTUAL)

Virtual

Mantras for Elephants: Tracking the Retreat of the Charismatic in the Malay World Faizah Zakaria Assistant Professor of History Nanyang Technological University Please click here to join the virtual meeting. No prior registration required. Meeting …

Anthro Job Talk: Courtney Wittekind (VIRTUAL)

Virtual

“Watching and Waiting:” Development, Deferral and Desire in Myanmar’s “New Yangon City” Courtney T. Wittekind PhD Candidate Department of Anthropology Harvard University Please click here to join the virtual meeting. No prior registration required. Meeting …

Friday Forum & History Teaching Demo: Juan Fernandez

George L. Mosse Humanities Building 455 N. Park St, Madison, WI

Juan Fernandez PhD Candidate in History Cornell University Title and abstract TBA. Location: Room 1121, Humanities Building Part of the Social Justice in Southeast Asia (SJSEA) Project faculty search in History. This event is free …

History Job Talk: Juan Fernandez

Curti Lounge, 5243 Mosse Humanities Building 455 N. Park St., Madison, WI

Juan Fernandez PhD Candidate in History Cornell University Location: Curti Lounge, Room 5243 Humanities Building. Title and abstract TBA. Part of the Social Justice in Southeast Asia (SJSEA) Project faculty search in History. This event …

Friday Forum: Omar Dumdum

206 Ingraham Hall 1155 Observatory Dr., Madison, WI

This presentation concretizes the notion that truth is gendered by examining how the credibility of women-led truth-telling professions are undermined through sexist and misogynistic attacks. Analysis of this phenomenon is grounded in the Philippines, where journalism has been dominated by women since the 1970s and critically acclaimed documentaries have been largely produced by women filmmakers. In tracing how gender stereotypes and segregation in these occupations become the base for devaluing truth-telling, this talk raises the question of whether journalism and documentary filmmaking have also become “feminized” — in a pejorative sense. Despite such attacks, women journalists and documentarians persist and find ways to perform their truth-telling functions to the public.