Friday Forum: Muhammad Adlin Sila

This talk is primarily based on my study being part of, and funded, by the project entitled the Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant DP00881464 “Being Muslim in Eastern Indonesia: Practice, Politics and Cultural Diversity,” with Kathryn Robinson and Andrew McWilliam as primary investigators. This project…

Friday Forum: John Roosa

The 1965-66 Massacres in Indonesia within the Frame of Genocide Studies: What is Gained, What is Lost Genocide Studies, since its beginnings as an academic field in the early 1980s, has worked with a more …

Friday Forum & Anthro Job Talk: Veronika Kusumaryati (VIRTUAL)

After the brutal killing of George Floyd sparked antiracism protests worldwide, Black youth organized protests in West Papua, Indonesia’s marginalized and easternmost region. In 2019, Papuans protested against entrenched racism in Indonesian society, when Papuan students in Java were subjected to racist epithets. Since then, Papuans have used the hashtag #Papuanlivesmatter to articulate their connection with broader antiracism protests across the world and bring the Papuan experience to #BlackLivesMatter movements. While global Black political movements have long shaped Papuan identities, the new Papuan Lives Matter movement shows how digital media have played an influential role in the spread of antiracism protests and how Blackness has been understood and articulated not only in relation to white supremacy but also to postcolonial claims of multiculturalism in Asian societies. This presentation discusses the specific context in which protests under Papuan Lives Matter emerged and its relationship with the global Black Lives Matter movements. This presentation also explores the idea of Blackness in West Papua that stems not only from the influence of and conversation with American Black political movements and African liberation movements but also lived experience as a Black people under Indonesian occupation.

Friday Forum: Julie Chernov Hwang

This presentation will highlight findings from original research in Indonesia and the Philippines analyzing the processes and pathways via which individuals join and commit to Islamist extremist groups and, in some cases, participate in acts of terrorism.