Spring 2022 Workshop: (Virtual) Empowering Educators to Teach on Genocide

Empowering Educators to Teach on Genocide: A Virtual Workshop 

January 15-16, 2022
Via Zoom
To register, click here.

We are excited to announce a new professional development workshop coming in January 2022!

This virtual event will empower Wisconsin’s K-12 educators to teach on genocide and fulfill the mandates of Act 30, the new law passed by the Wisconsin legislature and Governor Evers in April 2021. It will offer participants the chance to hear presentations by top experts and acquire free book sets and other practical materials for teaching on the subject of genocide and five specific cases: the Holocaust, Cambodia, Rwanda, Argentina, and the Uyghurs in China.

The first session on Saturday, January 15, will feature talks on genocide cases in regions of the world that our UW-Madison area studies centers represent. These six centers include the Centers for Southeast Asian, African, East Asian, European, and Latin American, Caribbean and Iberian Studies (LACIS), and the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA).

The second day’s session on Sunday, January 16, will feature a short overview of Act 30 by Kris McDaniel, Social Studies Education Consultant for the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, and a talk by Ilana Weltman, Project Director & Holocaust Education Instructor at The George Washington University-Graduate School of Education and Human Development. This will be followed by a presentation from Samantha Goldberg, Director of Education at the Nathan and Esther Pelz Holocaust Education Resource Center (HERC), on practical techniques and resources available for teaching confidently on genocide and other sensitive issues covered by the workshop. Educators will then have a chance to talk with fellow teachers during an interactive panel session of K-12 educators from Wisconsin.

This professional development opportunity is sponsored and organized by the area studies centers at UW-Madison, the Nathan and Esther Pelz Holocaust Education and Resource Center (HERC), and the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. For more information on our sponsors, please see below.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 15 | 9:00 A.M. – 2:00 P.M. Central Time

Introduction to the workshop on January 15 by Mary McCoy, Center for Southeast Asian Studies, UW-Madison.

Note: Each lecture is 30 minutes, followed by 15 minutes of Q&A. There is a 10-minute break between each speaker.

Keynote Address: “Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer”

9:05-9:50 A.M. 

Presented by Alexander Hinton, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights, and UNESCO Chair in Genocide Prevention at Rutgers University.

About the presentation: During the Khmer Rouge’s brutal reign in Cambodia during the mid-to-late 1970s, a former math teacher named Duch served as the commandant of the S-21 security center, where as many as 20,000 victims were interrogated, tortured, and executed. In 2009, Duch stood trial for these crimes against humanity. While the prosecution painted Duch as evil, his defense lawyers claimed he simply followed orders.

In his presentation, Alexander Hinton will discuss this case and offer a nuanced analysis of Duch, the tribunal, the Khmer Rouge, and the after-effects of Cambodia’s genocide. To address the question of how a person becomes a torturer and executioner, as well as the law’s ability to grapple with crimes against humanity, Dr. Hinton adapts Hannah Arendt’s notion of the “banality of evil” to consider how the potential for violence is embedded in the everyday ways people articulate meaning and comprehend the world. More broadly, Dr. Hinton’s presentation provides novel ways to consider justice, terror, genocide, memory, truth, and humanity.

Lecture by Ksenija Bilbija

10:00-10:45 A.M. 

Title and description coming soon. See the Presenters tab for more information on Ksenija Bilbija, Professor of Spanish American Literatures at UW-Madison.


Lunch Recess

10:45-11:15 A.M.


“Destroy, Replace…Repeat: State Violence in the Uyghur Homeland and its Historical Precedent”

11:15 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.

Presented by Timothy Grose, Associate Professor of China Studies at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology.

About the presentation: The crisis unfolding in the Uyghur homeland is one of the most brutal and complex examples of state violence in recent history. Although it has attracted the attention and drawn condemnation of policy makers, journalists, scholars and activists around the world, disagreement ensues over accurately and effectively labeling these destructive policies. Drawing almost entirely on sources with connections to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), this talk introduces the modes of violence—mass incarceration, religious persecution, cultural suppression, and coercive birth control—afflicting Uyghur communities. It then places these policies in a historical perspective by drawing parallels to the US federal government’s treatment of Native American populations, placing special attention on residential boarding schools. With these examples in hand, we will assess available terminology—crimes against humanity, cultural genocide, genocide, etc.—to best describe the CCP’s repression of Uyghurs.

“Learning to Talk About and Critically Represent Genocide: A Researcher’s Reflection”

12:10-12:55 P.M.

Presentation description coming soon. See the Presenters tab for more information on Kathryn Mara, Albert Markham Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of African Cultural Studies at UW-Madison.

 


SUNDAY, JANUARY 16 | 10:00 A.M. – 12:30 P.M. Central Time

Introduction to the second workshop session on January 16 by Kris McDaniel, Social Studies Education Consultant for the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, who will provide a short overview of Act 30 and its requirements.

Lecture by Ilana Weltman

10:15-11:00 A.M. 

Presentation description coming soon. See the Presenters tab for more information on Ilana Weltman, Project Director & Holocaust Education Instructor at The George Washington University-Graduate School of Education and Human Development.

“Holocaust Education Map Workshop”

11:10-11:55 A.M.

Presented by Samantha Goldberg, Director of Education at the Nathan & Esther Pelz Holocaust Education Resource Center.

About the presentation: A talk on methodology and the resources available to help educators confidently teach Holocaust and genocide studies.

Conversation with Teacher Panelists and Lunch

11:55 A.M. – end

Information on our panelists coming soon!

Alexander Hinton(@AlexLHinton) is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Director of the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights, and UNESCO Chair in Genocide Prevention at Rutgers University. He is the author or editor of sixteen books, including, most recently, It Can Happen Here: White Power and the Rising Threat of Genocide in the US (NYU, 2021), The Justice Facade: Trials of Transition in Cambodia (Oxford, 2018), and Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer (Duke, 2016). In recognition of his work on genocide, the American Anthropological Association selected Hinton as the recipient of the 2009 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology. Professor Hinton is also a past President of the International Association of Genocide Scholars (2011-13), a Member/Visitor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton (2011-13), and co-convener of the Global Consortium on Bigotry and Hate (2019-24). His next book, “Anthropological Witness” (Cornell, 2022), centers on his 2016 experience testifying as an expert witness at the Khmer Rouge tribunal in Cambodia.

Ilana Weltman (UW-Madison)
Project Director & Holocaust Education Instructor
The George Washington University-Graduate School of Education and Human Development

Ksenija Bilbija  (UW-Madison) is a professor of Spanish American Literatures at the University of Wisconsin-Madison specializing in cultural studies, gender criticism, post-traumatic memory and cartonera publishing. Her publications include: Cuerpos Textuales: Metáforas de la génesis narrativa en la literatura latinoamericana del siglo XX, and Yo soy trampa: Ensayos sobre la obra de Luisa Valenzuela. She co-edited The Art of Truth-Telling About Authoritarian Rule, Accounting for Violence: Marketing Memory in Latin America, Academia Cartonera: A Primer of Latin American Cartonera Publishers, and most recently Poner el cuerpo: rescatar y visibilizar las macros sexual y de genera de los archives dictatorialness del Cono Sur. From 2001-2006 she was the Editor of Letras Femeninas: Revista de Literatura Femenina Hispánica and from 2007-2012 she directed the Latin American, Caribbean and Iberian Studies Program. Her book on Argentine and Chilean postdictatorship fiction titled Ni perversas ni traidoras: Ficciones de colaboración femenina en las dictaduras de Argentina y Chile is forthcoming with Editorial Cuarto Propio in 2022.

Kathryn Mara (she/her/hers) earned her PhD from the Department of African Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she is currently an Albert Markham Postdoctoral Fellow. In her research, she employs ethnography and critical discourse analysis to explore discourse and cultural practices surrounding genocide. In particular, she is interested in commemorative and discursive practices, attitudes, and processes of socialization among people of Rwandan heritage living in Canada.

 

Timothy Grose, PhD is an associate professor of China Studies at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. His research on expressions of Uyghur ethno-national identities and public performances of Islamic piety has been published in the China Journal, Journal of Contemporary China, Ethnic and Racial Studies, China File, Dissent, and Foreign Policy. Timothy’s commentary on ethnic policy in Xinjiang has appeared in Al-Jazeera, The Atlantic, CNN, The Diplomat, Economist, The Guardian, and Vox among others. His book on boarding schools for Uyghur students, Negotiating Inseparability, was published by Hong Kong University Press in 2019 and awarded the 2020 Central Eurasian Studies Society book prize in social sciences.

Samantha Goldberg is Director of Education at the Nathan and Esther Pelz Holocaust Education Resource Center (HERC) in Milwaukee, WI. Originally from Redondo Beach, California, Sam received her Bachelor’s degree from California State University Channel Islands in Communication for Nonprofit Business. In 2019, she graduated from Uppsala University with her Master’s in Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Her thesis project took her to Rwanda where she researched the impact nonprofit peace education has had on the young generation. It was this interest in genocide education that brought her to HERC, where she works to engage teachers and students to learn stories from the Holocaust so the world can confidently say ‘Never Again.’

More information on teacher panel speakers coming soon. 

If you have any questions about the workshop, please contact Mary McCoy in the Center for Southeast Asian Studies at UW-Madison. Mary can be reached at: mccoy2@wisc.edu.

Videos of presentations from the first session will be posted here following the workshop.