Friday Forum: Derek Heng

Pre-modern port-cities of the Melaka Straits region were one of the most diverse places in Southeast Asia. The range of networks, the openness of the economy, the free movement of people, as well as the small population base in the region, has meant that from the inception of a port-city, the nature of the settlement and its population would reflect the multi-cultural influences that flow through the port…

Friday Forum: Oona Paredes

How can we imagine the spaces and peoples at the fringes of empire without centering empire? In this talk, I speculate on the challenges and possibilities of historicizing the “fringe” spaces of Southeast Asia, expanding on the concept of pericoloniality that I introduced tentatively in my earlier work on the ethnohistory of the various Lumad peoples of Mindanao…

Friday Forum: John Roosa

The 1965-66 Massacres in Indonesia within the Frame of Genocide Studies: What is Gained, What is Lost Genocide Studies, since its beginnings as an academic field in the early 1980s, has worked with a more …

Friday Forum: Mark Alves (VIRTUAL)

The goal of this talk is to present ways in which historical linguistics in greater Southeast Asia can benefit from and aid in research in archaeology and ethnohistory broadly. Southeast Asia (aka Indo-China) is known for its complex sociocultural mixing during waves of incoming groups through both settlements and trade from the Neolithic period into the era of SEAsian kingdoms. Exploration of cultural domains through proto-language lexical reconstructions, combined with information gleaned from historical phonology and research on language contact and loanwords, can provide insights into regional ethnohistory. There are, of course, limits to such data, but it is also to the detriment of ethnohistorical and ethnoarchaeological research to ignore what linguistic data has to offer…

Anthro Job Talk: Seinenu Thein-Lemelson (VIRTUAL)

The Burmese democracy movement and the community of political prisoners (known colloquially as naingkyin) that comprised it had a profound impact upon the trajectory of modern Burma, yet their contributions have been overlooked by scholars. What little scholarship exists on the democracy movement ignores the naingkyin’s culture, psychology, and subjectivity. There are no accounts of Burma written from the naingkyin’s point of view and few accounts that represent them as complex, whole, reflexive human beings embedded in an equally complex, whole, reflexive community. In this talk, I move past the dominant transnational discourses that have been used to analyze the Burmese democracy movement—that of human rights, humanitarianism, neoliberalism and the public health model of trauma. Instead, I focus on an indigenous concept known as anitnah, which resembles the English term of “sacrifice…”

Friday Forum & Anthro Job Talk: Darcie DeAngelo (VIRTUAL)

My fieldwork confronted me with two technologies- bombs and rats. Both were integral to understanding relations in the aftermath of war—that, in fact, these relations were transformed not only by the humans but by the nonhumans who actively disarmed the land, namely, landmine detection rats. Fears of militarism became disrupted when a rat came into the minefield. The rat itself provoked feelings of love between human deminers. The rat, as landmine detection technology and a being, helped to alter feelings of war that the bombs perpetuated. I soon began to realize that this had implications for how trauma and healing, ecological relations, and transitional justice, all of which I found to be entangled.

Friday Forum: Katherine Bowie

Eunuchs in Southeast Asia: Of Matrilineality and Theravada Buddhist Harems Compared to other Asian courts, eunuchs were relatively absent in Southeast Asian courts. Given the close association of eunuchs with Chinese and Muslim harems, this …